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Checking if old server still has traffic

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by GoWilkes, Mar 24, 2014.

  1. GoWilkes

    GoWilkes Well-Known Member

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    I've moved all content from one server to another, and updated the DNS records on the old server to point to the new IP. And, of course, I've changed the nameservers for the domains.

    At least one local internet provider, though, is notorious for taking up to 6 weeks to update their DNS records. Last time I changed servers (a few years ago), it took more than 2 months! So, I'm nervous about taking the old server offline too soon.

    With all of the DNS records pointing to the new IP, though, how can I see how much external traffic the old server is getting? Presumably, even if the DNS records aren't updated, they would hit the old server and be immediately redirected to the new, so what can I measure to see that it was initially pinged?
     
  2. Sys Admin

    Sys Admin Well-Known Member

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    Did you reduce the TTL values? Pointed the DNS zones on old server to point to the new IPs? If so, You can switch off the webserver (I.E: apache) on your old server
     
  3. GoWilkes

    GoWilkes Well-Known Member

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    I did, but I still have to wait for the internet providers to recognize these changes.

    I did all of that two years ago, too, but when I shut down the server I started getting phone calls from people that couldn't get connected. So, in spite of the changes, they were STILL seeing the old server.
     
  4. cPanelMichael

    cPanelMichael Forums Analyst
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    Hello :)

    Name server activity is logged to /var/log/messages but it's going to be difficult to determine which internet providers still use cached name server records. It seems strange that an Internet provider would use DNS records that are several weeks old. Have you considered contacting the provider in question to have them update their records or policies?

    Thank you.
     
  5. GoWilkes

    GoWilkes Well-Known Member

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    When we dealt with this last time, the local cable provider denied any responsibility. But it was obviously not a coincidence that every one of their customers were still seeing the old DNS, when everyone else had updated.

    The real problem, though, is that if one local internet provider didn't update regularly, there's the risk that there are hundreds of other similar providers across the US that don't update, either.
     
  6. cPanelMichael

    cPanelMichael Forums Analyst
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    Did you check last time to rule out a DNS cache issue with the individual users? For instance, you could have had them clear their DNS cache using the instructions here:

    cPanel - Clear DNS Cache

    Thank you.
     
  7. GoWilkes

    GoWilkes Well-Known Member

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    Back then, what we found was that if the user changed their DNS to use OpenDNS, it solved the problem; that's how we figured out that it was a DNS issue in the first place.

    So we could fix it one at a time, but that only works if you know how to get in touch with all of your users without using the website. And, of course, it doesn't help new users that have no idea why they can't access the site.
     
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