SOLVED CPANEL-35592 - Jailed shell users can't access manual pages.

RonanRBR

Member
Aug 11, 2014
18
3
53
Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
When a jailed shell user try access a man page, like:
Bash:
$ man ls
man: can't open the manpath configuration file /etc/man_db.conf
I don't think this is a problem with permissions:
Bash:
$ ls -la /etc/man_db.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5.1K Oct 30  2018 man_db.conf
I can't figure out why an jailed shell user can't access manual pages.
 
Last edited:

cPJustinD

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 12, 2021
286
51
103
Houston
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
Hey there! Thank you for bringing this to our attention. It appears that jailed shell users are unable to access the manual pages as /etc/man_db.conf is not included in the default VirtFS configuration. We've filed an internal case regarding this issue with our development team, CPANEL-35592. You can find updates regarding this case in our changelogs:


Let us know if you have any other questions!
 

cPJustinD

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 12, 2021
286
51
103
Houston
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
It is possible to make changes to the VirtFS configuration, although this would require the use of custom jailed shell mounts. We do have some documentation on setting up custom jailed shell mounts here:


However, in order to utilize these mounts to specify specific configuration files, you will want to work with your system administrator to determine the best method of adding in these configurations.

I hope that this helps. Let us know if you have any other questions. I would also recommend commenting on the following feature request once it becomes available:

 
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RonanRBR

Member
Aug 11, 2014
18
3
53
Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
It is possible to make changes to the VirtFS configuration, although this would require the use of custom jailed shell mounts. We do have some documentation on setting up custom jailed shell mounts here:


However, in order to utilize these mounts to specify specific configuration files, you will want to work with your system administrator to determine the best method of adding in these configurations.

I hope that this helps. Let us know if you have any other questions. I would also recommend commenting on the following feature request once it becomes available:

Thank you, I already voted on this feature request.

I had also seen the custom moint points, thanks, but like already said on comment: create a custom mount point just for add some global configuration files on /etc, like: nanorc, toprc, or another unimportant but useful configuration file it's the worst kind "work around" solution.
I'll try await for this feature =)
 
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