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Creating general-use admin users that work with cPanel

Discussion in 'cPanel Developers' started by jhutchinson, Oct 12, 2009.

  1. jhutchinson

    jhutchinson Registered

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    High folks. I have what I think might be a fairly unique demand of cPanel, and I'm curious if you guys have any solutions or best-practice recommendations.

    We have 5 people on our web team and we administer over 30 different domains set up in cPanel. As such, we have set up 5 new users and put them in the wheel group (and a few in the root group) so we can muck about on the server via SSH in our own preferred work environment (e.g., I prefer vim, but Tim prefers emacs). In an ideal world, we'd like to use these users as our FTP/SSH users when working on sites. As it is, currently I can SSH in and see all the contents of the home directory. But because domains are created with their own group (e.g., sitename:sitename), we don't have group access to their domain folders and we have to sudo to do anything. Furthermore, it becomes tedious to add all 5 of us to a new site's group every time a new site is added and do all the proper chmodding. It seems the way cPanel wants us to work is to log in as each domain's user and work in these walled gardens, having to log in and out of various users as our daily work takes us from domain to domain. This makes things quite tedious.

    What I'm wondering is if you know of any modifications or add-ons that would allow us to use our own user to do basic site administration without having to sudo or chmod during the whole process? It seems it could be as simple as getting cPanel to add each domain to a new custom group every time it creates a domain, but I don't want to go hacking cPanel without talking to you guys first.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. jhutchinson

    jhutchinson Registered

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    Wow, really? No one has dealt with anything like this?
     
  3. jhutchinson

    jhutchinson Registered

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    Creating general-use *nix users that work with cPanel

    High folks. I have what I think might be a fairly unique demand of cPanel, and I'm curious if you guys have any solutions or best-practice recommendations.

    We have 5 people on our web team and we administer over 30 different domains set up in cPanel. As such, we have set up 5 new users and put them in the wheel group (and a few in the root group) so we can muck about on the server via SSH in our own preferred work environment (e.g., I prefer vim, but Tim prefers emacs). In an ideal world, we'd like to use these users as our FTP/SSH users when working on sites. As it is, currently I can SSH in and see all the contents of the home directory. But because domains are created with their own group (e.g., sitename:sitename), we don't have group access to their domain folders and we have to sudo to do anything. Furthermore, it becomes tedious to add all 5 of us to a new site's group every time a new site is added and do all the proper chmodding. It seems the way cPanel wants us to work is to log in as each domain's user and work in these walled gardens, having to log in and out of various users as our daily work takes us from domain to domain. This makes things quite tedious.

    What I'm wondering is if you know of any modifications or add-ons that would allow us to use our own user to do basic site administration without having to sudo or chmod during the whole process? It seems it could be as simple as getting cPanel to add each domain to a new custom group every time it creates a domain, but I don't want to go hacking cPanel without talking to you guys first.

    Thoughts?
     
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