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Detect the most recent kernel at shell?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by jols, Sep 13, 2009.

  1. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Is there a command to run that will tell you which kernel is the most recent according to the OS of the server?
     
  2. thewebhosting

    thewebhosting Well-Known Member

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    You can type the below command through SSH which will show all versions of kernel available:

    $ yum info kernel
     
  3. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Thanks very much for this. I am sure it will help.

    By the way, when you run this command, does it take into consideration the configuration of the server you are running? In other words, will it specify the proper kernel according to the server you have, e.g. multi-processor, etc.?
     
  4. acenetryan

    acenetryan Well-Known Member
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    It does not. If you have something like a PAE kernel installed, you would have to run:

    yum info kernel-PAE

    The same is true for:

    yum list kernel

    or:

    yum list kernel-PAE

    I find 'list' less verbose and to the point. 'info' gives you more details about the package itself.
     
  5. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Thanks very much for the response.

    Correct me if I'm wrong (please), but I have been told that the PAE version should be installed for any 32bit OS with more than 3GB of memory, e.g. so the system can utilise the entire 4GB of installed ram.

    Is this true?
     
  6. serversignature

    serversignature Well-Known Member

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    Yes ... true

    PAE kernel = 32bit OS + 4GB or more RAM

    Physical Address Extension (PAE) is a feature of some x86 and x86-64 processors that enables the use of more than 4 gigabytes of physical memory to be used in 32-bit systems. It requires a CPU with Physical Address Extensions (PAE).

    But your OS should support that.

    Use the Linux kernel compiled for PAE capable machines. Install the kernel-PAE package if your machine has more than 4GB of memory.
     
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