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Diskspace used by cPanel using a VPS

Discussion in 'Workarounds and Optimization' started by floppyfringe, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. floppyfringe

    floppyfringe Active Member

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    I have a 60GB WHM VPS Optimized 3, but my disk space used is over 60%. I've created a WHM Reseller account for myself, natually giving myself all the resources, but I'm not using 60% of 60GB. How big is cPanel?

    Before having the 60GB VPS, I managed perfectly fine with a 20GB WHM reseller account, and only used about 10GB-15GB of that. I moved to a VPS so I could firewall ability, so fair it's been 100% uptime, although the uptime was worse on the 20GB reseller account.

    Although I've transfered my domains over, I'm someone worried, roughtly how much disk space does the cPanel and whatever OS stuff need?

    Anyone got any spring cleaning tips? I expect cPanel needs some space for it's cPanel stuff, but seriously how much of the 60GB should I expect to be able to use as "my own", how much does cPanel really need? And it's not the backup files in order to restore the domains.

    Thanks

    P.s. I suspect it's a zillion README files :-p if you know the real answer please say :)
     
  2. Eric

    Eric Administrator
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    Howdy,

    I just installed a new CentOS6 machine and I have no where near that much disk usage.

    root@grimlock [~]# df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1 99G 3.8G 90G 5% /
    /dev/sda4 743G 197M 705G 1% /backup
    /dev/sda3 985G 522M 934G 1% /home
    /usr/tmpDSK 485M 11M 449M 3% /tmp

    There could be some backups or cache files used from yum that could be some of the size issue. I would start using du -h --max-depth=1 and crawl around and find your size problem. You could have a stray log file or mysql database eating up precious drive space.

    Thanks!
     
  3. floppyfringe

    floppyfringe Active Member

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    Thanks, I didn't know how get a directory listing along with the space used by that directory before.

    Backups go to a separate system and I download log files (exim and website)

    I'm still unsure as to what might be some useless "rollback" backup/restore directory/directories

    Got any ideas where there could be some unwanted cobwebs that need dusting (deleteing) away?
     
  4. faisikhan

    faisikhan Well-Known Member

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    Hi floppyfringe,

    1. Check for files on located under mount points. Frequently if you mount a directory onto a filesystem that already had a file or directories under it, you lose the ability to see those files, but they're still consuming space on the underlying disk.
    2. Are you sure about the fact that there is no consumption of exim logs on the server?
    3. Files that are open by a program do not actually go away when you delete them, they go away when the program closes them. A program might have a huge temporary file or disc usage that you can't see. If it's a zombie program, you might need to reboot to clear those files.
    4. On Linux you can easily remount the whole root partition (or any other partition for that matter) to another place in you filesystem say /mnt for example mount -o bind / /mnt then you can do a du -h /mnt and see what uses up your space.
    5. Also did you contact your host about it & also would you like to paste the output of df -sh here :)
     
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