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How to undo accidental yum update from command line

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by actived, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. actived

    actived Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    well, duh, I accidentally copy-pasted a few yum commands that were supposed to run on my local centos machine, into an open root console on our cpanel server. (Stuff happens, as they say :( )

    The resulting chaos, it seems, is limited to me having done the following:

    1. added a repo to /etc/yum.repos.d/

    2. yum update -y

    3. resulting installation of following packages:
    * yum-utils
    * kernel-xen.x86_64 2.6.18-308.13.1.el5

    4. Luckily, I havent installed anything from the new repo, so I guess I can safely delete the repo file. Is that right?

    Current config (before this event):
    WHM 11.32.3 (build 23) , RELEASE build
    CENTOS 5.8 x86_64 xenpv on server2
    kernel-xen.x86_64 already had 2.6.18-308.el5, 2.6.18-308.1.1.el5, 2.6.18-308.4.1.el5

    Do I need to rollback the latest version (from 'updates' repo) of kernel-xen 2.6.18-308.13.1.el5 ?

    Thanks in advance!
    Dave
     
  2. Eric

    Eric Administrator
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    Howdy,

    You could grab the old version of the rpm from a repro and RPM them into place. You might have to use the --force a lot too.

    Thanks!
     
  3. actived

    actived Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply!

    Well actually, I'd like to get something clarified before doing something drastic:
    1.
    Do I really need to uninstall the 308.13.1.el5 version considering that I already have 308.el5, 308.1.1.el5, 308.4.1.el5 as part of standard automatic updates?

    2.
    If I do have to uninstall it, isnt it a single instruction to uninstall that package?
    What I didnt get is this:
    Why would I need to get an old version of the rpm - I probably will have to just tell it to use the older version - 308.4.1 - that too if it doesnt pick it up automatically after I uninstall 308.13.1, no?

    Since 4.1 is already installed.

    I didnt get the --force part or the part where I would have to install an rpm...

    A bit confused, to be honest.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  4. cPanelTristan

    cPanelTristan Quality Assurance Analyst
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    You haven't booted into the new kernel right? If that's the case, then simply remove the new kernel and ensure to pick --nodeps when removing it, and ensure that /boot contains the current kernel you are using.

    If you did boot into the new kernel, you'll have to reboot into an old kernel (change /etc/grub.conf to boot into 2 or whatever isn't the new kernel), then revise /etc/grub.conf and remove the new kernel.
     
  5. actived

    actived Well-Known Member

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    [solved] Re: How to undo accidental yum update from command line

    No, I hadn't booted into the new kernel :)
    So it was a simple uninstall command to remove it:
    Code:
    rpm -e --nodeps kernel-xen-2.6.18-308.13.1.el5
    I've only ever used ubuntu until recently, so I thought it better to ask before doing something drastic on a production CentOS server - I wouldnt have thought of "--nodeps" myself.
    So thanks a ton!
    CPanel is a nice system, although for obvious stability reasons, a bit too restrictive for experimenting - but then the uptime for our server is currently 82 days without a reboot :)
    Thanks for that too!
     
    #5 actived, Aug 29, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2012
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