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Kernel Update

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by stimpybhz, Dec 19, 2003.

  1. stimpybhz

    stimpybhz Member

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    i used up2date

    and i have:

    #rpm -q kernel
    kernel-2.4.20-24.9
    kernel-2.4.20-8
    kernel-2.4.20-18.9
    kernel-2.4.20-20.9


    but how i use the image from Kernel-2.4.20-24.9 ?

    I dont have lilo.conf at my machine
    i have an grub.conf

    And Cpanels keep saying

    You are running an insecure kernel (2.4.20-18.9). You should upgrade to a newer version as soon as possible to avoid your system being compromised.

    Someone could help me ?
     
  2. Pyro411

    Pyro411 Active Member

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    after you've installed the newest kernel for your system & ran lilo. reboot.

    :) they haven't quite gotten the hotswap kernel going yet, hopefully soon.
     
  3. stimpybhz

    stimpybhz Member

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    I dont have lilo, but Grub.
     
  4. efeito

    efeito Well-Known Member
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    Did you reboot?
     
  5. stimpybhz

    stimpybhz Member

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  6. cortices

    cortices Well-Known Member

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    The update system does not make the newly installed kernel active. You must manually edit the grub configuration file and make it active.

    This is all very highly documented in Redhat's support area.
     
  7. jsteel

    jsteel Well-Known Member

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    1) Open up /etc/grub.conf for editing
    2) Verify the first "title" entry is the kernel you want loaded (when installing new kernel RPMs, the newest is put at the top of the list).
    3) The order of the list is top down starting with 0, then 1, etc.
    4) So assuming you want the first entry loaded, change the line "default=1" to be "default=0". that will load the first "title" entry in your list. The value defaults to the last kernel you loaded (after reboot).
    5) Reboot your machine to load the new kernel.
     
  8. Website Rob

    Website Rob Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, assuming one has a 'boot' partition, why would you not edit:

    /boot/grub/grub.conf   instead of   /etc/grub.conf
    (since they are both identical files anyway)

    And does not the order of the list go from bottom up? (starting with zero)
    So, if there were 3 'title' entries and the top one was to be used, then default=2.
     
  9. cortices

    cortices Well-Known Member

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    I would think it would have to be on the boot partition like you say, as grub needs access to it before the kernel is loaded. (though it's just a guess) At any rate, it has always been /boot/grub/grub.conf for me.

    The order is top to bottom. If you had 3 stanzas, it would be 0, 1, and finally 2.
     
  10. jsteel

    jsteel Well-Known Member

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    The /etc/grub.conf is a symlink to wherever the actual grub.conf resides. Having it in /etc conforms to unix standards.

    It is top to bottom as I stated earlier and cortices was kind enough to re-iterate.
     
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