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mailscanner on freeBSD

Discussion in 'E-mail Discussions' started by michaelcaplan, Nov 17, 2003.

  1. michaelcaplan

    michaelcaplan Member

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    Hi,

    I've been working on installing mailscanner on freeBSD machine and have had mixed results. I am wondering what other people's experiance has been.

    Originally, I tried installing mailscanner and clamav with the cpanel autoinstaller. I had no luck with this. It seems that the exim port on my machine was built to only allow config files to be read from /usr/local/etc/exim Starting exim with the -C attribute pointing to a config file in any other directory results in a critical error reporting that the config file was unreadable.

    I tried to rebuild exim with WITHOUT_ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX=yes to enable config files to be read from other directories, but the build kept on failing with syntax errors. I am still waiting to here back from the port maintainer on this...


    So, the solution I have come up so far is this: I've installed both mailscanner and clamav from the ports collection. In order to get exim up running with two daemons, I rigged the attached startup script. This works well, minus some drawbacks:

    1) WHM queue manger breaks
    2) Upon the nighly /scripts/upcp both my changed startup scripts (/etc/rc.d/init.d/exim && /usr/local/etc/rc.d/exim.sh) get replaced with cpanel's default. The replaced startup scripts fail to reboot exim if this should happen.
    3) WHM view relayers ppears to be broken as well, but then again I don't think it worked before the changes either.

    I'm curious to hear how other freeBSD users manage mailscanner on there system.

    Michael
     

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  2. bjarne

    bjarne Well-Known Member

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    You can chatter +i or something like that (check man page) to avoid that WHM updates the config files. That is common practise for whm users.

    Mailq manager don't work anyway - inside whm so I don't think it's becasue of you it don't work.

    I don't understand - is there two startup scripts? I know there are exim config files in etc, but they are not used as far as I can tell at least ..? I was thinking the startup script in /usr/local/etc/rc.d was the valid on? Or is this one only for manualy starting and stoping when the server is running?


    It would be a great help for my and I belve others if you could go in more detail about what you did to make Malscanner work on FreeBSD.
    Thanks for posting gives valueble input on what to do!
     
  3. michaelcaplan

    michaelcaplan Member

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    Thanks for the chatter tip. Interesting to hear that it was not me who broke WHM mailq manager

    I actually just dumped my freeBSD install and replaced it with RedHat 9 (it is a whole other story, and is certainly not a comment on freeBSD vs. Redhat), so I can only comment form memory.

    On system bootup, an /etc/rc.d/init.d/exim is automatically exectuted in order to bring up services. A totally seperate (/usr/local/etc/rc.d/exim.sh), although identical, file is used to manage exim. /scripts/restartsrv executes the latter when you restart exim.

    Michael
     
  4. bjarne

    bjarne Well-Known Member

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    How do you think when RedHat ends lifetime on RH 9 next year then. Expect updates will be available somehow anyway or? I think better to go for the Entreprice version of RH when WHM is ready to run on this one - I notice they already have a beta version ready.

    I am wery disepointet with the fact that WHM on FreeBSD
    realy is on the level of - will it work or not.
     
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