Please whitelist cPanel in your adblocker so that you’re able to see our version release promotions, thanks!

The Community Forums

Interact with an entire community of cPanel & WHM users!

Moving accounts question

Discussion in 'Data Protection' started by dejanb, Jan 29, 2018.

  1. dejanb

    dejanb Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Serbia
    cPanel Access Level:
    Root Administrator
    Hello!

    I have a problem with a disk space on my cPanel server, i added second hard drive with home2 name, and by the cpanel stuff, it will expand to that hard drive in the future, when there is no space anymore on the first one. Now, what i need: i need to backup cpanel accounts, but i have a less than 20% on the system disk where are stored user accounts, so can i move earlier created accounts to the second disk, so i can run remote backup normaly, or can i somewhere in the backup settings specify that backup is first created on the second disk, where i have a plenty of space than sent via ftp to the remote server?

    Regard!
     
  2. 24x7server

    24x7server Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,834
    Likes Received:
    85
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    India
    cPanel Access Level:
    Root Administrator
    Hi,

    You can directly use the /home2 directory to create the backups. There is no need to rearrange it.. However, if you want disk partition that is future proof, then you must consult a professional system administrator who will guide you through to it..
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. dejanb

    dejanb Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Serbia
    cPanel Access Level:
    Root Administrator
    Hi,

    Ok, but i only have less than 20% left on the first hdd, and when remote backup starts at scheduled time, it take all the space left and system services stops running. Where can i specify /home2 as backup dir. when remote backup is running? i'm using and configuring cPanel backup tool from WHM of my server, just to mention.

    Regards!
     
  4. 24x7server

    24x7server Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,834
    Likes Received:
    85
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    India
    cPanel Access Level:
    Root Administrator
    Hi,

    The backup configuration that you do via the WHM does provide destination place where the backup are stored, so it takes direct backup at that location and then it uploads to the remote server.. Check if you have set the backup destination location to first drive..
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. cPanelMichael

    cPanelMichael Forums Analyst
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    44,344
    Likes Received:
    1,852
    Trophy Points:
    363
    cPanel Access Level:
    Root Administrator
    Hello,

    You can configure the "Default Backup Directory" option using "WHM >> Backup Configuration".

    Thank you.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  6. CPWorld

    CPWorld Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2018
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    cPanel Access Level:
    DataCenter Provider
    I don't know if you realize this but you can actually use your new hard drive to expand your existing partitions so those span both hard drives which is one of the really nice things about Linux that is quite easy to setup where you have your existing /home but the new drive is also itself added on a /home and its storage space simply appended to your existing /home.

    I am assuming that you setup the new drive as /home2 because you want to use it for actual hosting accounts for some specfic reason instead of simply using the new drive as your backup drive?

    NOTE: It makes more sense to have backups on a different physical drive than the hosting accounts and operating system.

    There are a great many options where you can keep your existing accounts as they are untouched:

    Instead of partitioning the new drive as /home2, you could set it up as /home and then move everything from the original /home
    (temporarily renamed) to the new /home physically on the new drive. This would place all your hosting accounts on their
    own hard drive separate from both the operating system and also from the backups.

    Alternatively, if you are really set on putting hosting accounts on both /home and /home2, you could partition your new drive with both /home2 and /backup as partitions and then move all the existing backups into the new drive "/backup" mount point. Your original hosting accounts remain untouched and you would instead move the existing backups to the new /backup mount point
    on the new hard drive

    I've also seen people just setup a simple "/home2" mount for the new drive like what you described along with a "/home2/backup" folder on that drive, move the existing backup files from "/backup" to "/home2/backup" and then replace the original /backup folder on the original drive with a symlink to "/home2/backup" and this is less elegant but works just as well usually.

    You can also go into your configuration in WHM and simply change the location of your backup folder to be more direct.

    Whatever configuration you setup, it it far easier and less work to move your backups to the new drive than to try to migrate your accounts and / or main system over to the new drive for which there would be no real purpose whatsoever. It kind of sounds like that you maybe have in mind splitting your existing accounts between /home and /home2 thinking that would reduce the space from your original drive for backup processing but one major flaw in that thought aside from making more work for yourself is that you will drastically slow down backup performance as opposed to opportunities to actually improve it and you will still leave all your backups being processed as is handling again accounts located from both drives which in a way defeats the point.

    If it were me in this scenario, I would usually just simply add the entire new drive to the system mounted as /backup and move any existing backups you have from the original backup folder on the older drive to the new /backup mount point running from the new drive. If your new drive were unusually large with too much space to dedicate solely to backups alone then perhaps partition the new drive to additionally either extend /home or create a /home2 partition with whatever space you choose not to allocate to the previously discussed /backup partition on the new drive.

    In this configuration, your original drive stays essentially untouched entirely and you don't have to worry about any of the complexities of moving or potentially messing up any accounts. You likewise don't create a mess of symlinks in the process or have to worry about web files or databases pointing to the wrong paths in your hosting accounts.

    Any space previously used for backup files on your original drive becomes free and available to be used by your hosting accounts in each of these scenarios. Meanwhile your backups are stored entirely on the new drive which is good because that means your operating system and all your existing accounts at this time are on a physically separate drive from the backups and that gives you added protection of not losing your backups in the same drive failure or vice versa.

    Plus with those configurations placing accounts and backups on different physical hard drives verses accounts split between both drives, your backup performance will be improved as well because you are not simultaneously running hosting accounts and processing backup data on the same hardware interface. This makes a significant difference to loads and processing performance.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice