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Mysqld is taking much CPU

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by raamee, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. raamee

    raamee Active Member

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    Hello,

    Mysqld seems to take much CPU. Here's the top command.


    24006 mysql 30 15 73420 38m 4688 S 17.6 1.5 99:22.27 mysqld

    17.6 is CPU usage. It was normal and I don't know how it consumes too much cpu now. Any help please? Thanks.
     
  2. LinuxTechie

    LinuxTechie Well-Known Member

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  3. AunRaza

    AunRaza Member

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    for better understanding of which particular mysql databases are causing issues, try running mysqladmin processlist command and see which particular database is the main source of high consumption of resources..
     
  4. raamee

    raamee Active Member

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    Yea, thanks for that idea.! The load is normal now.

    @AunRaza

    Sure, I will do that. Thanks.
     
  5. MattLee

    MattLee BANNED

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    Hello,

    It's important to note that it's not unusual that MySQL will be the process that uses the highest amount of CPU on a server.

    A Few Tips for Managing MySQL CPU Usage:
    Always make sure you are staying out of swap memory. Whenever a server starts using swap, it has to read and write to the hard drives causing significant I/O wait. I/O wait is the bane of a well performing server; If you're hitting it, it's time to add more ram.

    The type of queries that are being performed and the size of the database that they are being performed on matter. Always keep an eye on database size. You can monitor the current activity of the MySQL process with: 'mysqladmin processlist'.

    The type of software that your users are running matters considerably. A Wordpress blog doesn't contribute nearly as much usage as a Vbulletin forum.
     
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