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PHP 5.3.2 is this one safe to upgrade to yet?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by jols, Mar 21, 2010.

  1. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Seems like there were some compatibility issue with PHP 5.3.1

    Has this been resolved yet with 5.3.2? Does anyone know?
     
  2. Spiral

    Spiral BANNED

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    Unless you are a PHP programmer and script author, I do not recommend moving up to any of the PHP 5.3.x series at this time and per your comment asking "has this been resolved", it is clear to me that you do not fully understand the situation because it sounds like you think it is some kind of "bug" that needs fixing --- IT IS NOT!

    There is going to be massive changes when PHP 6.0 is released and all program authors are going to have to completely rewrite all their programs to work under the new PHP generation so basically what they did in PHP 5.3 is went ahead and started implementing some of those changes to get script programmers forward moving towards changing their code to be more in line with what PHP 6.0 is going to be like.

    There is not now nor is there going to be any "fix" or anything to "resolve compatibility issues" as you said in your post above ....

    What will need to happen is that all the major script and web program authors out there will all need to release new versions of their software designed to support PHP 5.3.x and though a few have done this already, most by and large still have not yet made this move yet and until this happens, it would be very unwise for anyone to move up to PHP 5.3.x because the vast majority of PHP applications will have major problems running under PHP 5.3.x because of the many PHP language changes that are not backwards compatible to earlier versions.

    Eventually, most all of the current active and popular PHP scripts and programs out there will indeed be rewritten for PHP 5.3.x and above by all their respective programmers and once that happens and all the programs you might have in use have all been updated then at that time it will be time then to go ahead and make the jump and upgrade your PHP to the new version series but not until then.

    At the current time however, the only people using PHP 5.3.x should mainly be just PHP programmers who need to test updates to their code against the new PHP version series and that is pretty much it!

    Right now at the time of this post, the best PHP version to be using on production servers with the PHP applications that are
    out there is PHP version 5.2.13
     
  3. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Hi. Thanks for your detailed response about this. A bit of a bummer however, but I guess it's part of the landscape with this kind o biz.

    I remember making the leap from PHP 4.x to PHP 5.x. And no, I just could not see the sense in installing both if PHP 5 was going to be such a great improvement in speed and security.

    The transition went smooth for most, but for some, e.g. those that had highly custom packages that did not want to do it all over again with a significant upgrade (yeah, I know), it was downright traumatic.

    Perhaps someday they will see fit to write an emulator or wrapper (?) for downward compatibility, for these generational upgrades of the PHP system.

    Thanks again Spiral for your post, and for helping us wee folk who do not know any better, (i.e. the difference between PHP 5.2.x and PHP 5.3.x) to avoid havoc, red alerts, general panic, support tickets running wild in the streets, and a breakdown of swivelization as we know it.
     
  4. Spiral

    Spiral BANNED

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    Actually your mention of the PHP 4 to PHP 5 transition is a bad example and some interesting history goes along with all of that .....

    Many people tried running both PHP 4 and PHP 5 back when it first came out of false belief they couldn't run their PHP 4 scripts and ended up causing themselves problems that they would never have had had they just run PHP 5 by itself from the very start and that was the great irony when PHP 5 was first released unknown to everyone.

    Contrary to the popular thought at the time, PHP 5 was actually fully backward compatible to PHP 4 from the very beginning except for a few very rarely used functions and all but the rarest of PHP 4 scripts still worked perfectly on PHP 5 without any modifications whatsoever.

    The problem of the time was that MySQL 5 was first released roughly around the same time as the release of PHP 5 and unlike PHP where it did actually have full backwards compatibility for the most past, MySQL on the other hand was not backwards compatible and made very substantial changes forcing people to write new code to support the new database version and it was this issue that in fact actually caused a lot of the early misconceptions regarding PHP 5 that actually never existed.

    PHP 6 however will not be like the previous history though as the word is that they will not be doing what they did with PHP 5 where the engine for PHP 5 supported both PHP 4 and PHP 5 coding standards and the next generation will just being leaving the old behind entirely this time much more closer to the same manner that MySQL 5 left behind MySQL 4.

    In the meantime though, PHP 5.3.1 and PHP 5.3.2 have already begun the process of making that evolutionary jump by changing aspects of the language and functions in manners which are forward looking but not backwards compatible towards old generation PHP code.

    For those hosts who want to support and adopt PHP 5.3.x earlier, my suggestion to you is to get a single server with only PHP 5.3.x installed (not installing both versions -- you don't want to do that) and then those few clients who absolutely insist on having the latest despite advice to do otherwise could have their sites deployed on the PHP 5.3.x machine while all other clients can have PHP 5.2.13 on other machines and this is personally how I would go about making the transition to support the new PHP from a hosting standpoint on this issue.
     
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