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Removing mod_suphp - Will I be sorry?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by DavidR, Dec 2, 2007.

  1. DavidR

    DavidR Well-Known Member

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    WHM/cPanel 11 RELEASE, php 4.47, mysql 4.1x, Apache 1.3x, Cento 5

    I want to take advantage of the speed increase of eaccelerator, so I'm thinking of removing mod_suphp. Most of the sites I host are those I have developed and take care of. It's not a wild open shared environment, so I'm thinking that mod_suphp is not as necessary - would I be correct? Isn't it mainly to protected against things an account owner would do, or am I significantly less safe overall without it?

    Also, I know I will need to make a few directories 777 writable again, but other than that, is there anything I should expect to break once I remove it?

    I have 2-3 sites that are pretty busy and php based, I think if I could reduced their load spikes, I can avoid throwing more resources at the problem.

    Thanks,
     
  2. chopperb

    chopperb Active Member

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    You should upgrade php and mysql first. They will give you a good performance gain.
     
  3. DavidR

    DavidR Well-Known Member

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    You know, I've been thinking of that. I have some clients using osCommerce installs that would have to be reworked a bit, and this is their heavy season so I don't want to mess too much with it. However, there are several choices in EA3 for the new versions, along with new Apache. Any suggestions on which combo would be the best (stable) jumping from the old to the new? I would be upgrading mysql, php, apache.
     
  4. chopperb

    chopperb Active Member

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    With out knowing what osCommerce installs are present. I couldnt tell ya. Best thing you could do is check the developers of the osCommerce website for min requirements to see what apache,php and mysql are supported.
     
  5. brianoz

    brianoz Well-Known Member

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    suphp really protects you against the actions of an account owner. Even if the account owner is friendly, it's still useful in that it can limit the effects of a compromise. Without it, an attack on one account could potentially see database contents from other accounts and if the passwords are the same as cpanel passwords, they'll have full access as your users.

    Having said that, if you have tight control over your users and keep your software and PHP applications up to date, and use mod_security well, you should be fine to run PHP as a module. For a server with a few heavily used sites I'd expect you to see better performance during the spikes immediately you move to PHP as a module.
     
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