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Server Capacity

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by gilman01, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. gilman01

    gilman01 Member

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    I'm hoping someone can give me some guidance with regard to server capacity and cpanel.

    I have a Dual Xeon 2.4 GHz. server with 1 GB RAM and 80 GB hard drive. I currently have 84 domains on the server.

    What considerations should be given to when I'm putting too much strain on the server as far as ading new accounts?

    During the day the server will spike as high as 2.5 CPU's but I think that's because of the load placed by MailScanner. I'm only using 11% of total disk space in /home partition and bandwidth isn't an issue.

    I'm about to load a rather large real estate agency on this machine and want to make sure I'm not putting my other clients in jeopardy. I just don't have a clue as to what I should be watching besides the server load.

    Would increasing the memory to 2 GB be of any benefit? Would it allow me to add additional domains without fear of overloading the server?

    Any guidance would be appreciated.
     
  2. Serra

    Serra Well-Known Member

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    A dual Xeon can run one site or 500 sites, it really depends on the sites, so in a site count basis, there is no real way to give you an specific advice.

    If your load is running about 2.5 all day, then your server is reaching capacity. Remember that your server's load should be less than the number of CPUs. Of course, that isn't exactly true either, but its a nice guide. If you load is running higher than your number of CPU, then you might be full.

    Also, your memory and your load are not directly related. Look at your memory usage and if it is really high then adding memory will reduce your load, if its not high, then more memory will be much less effective.
     
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  3. SageBrian

    SageBrian Well-Known Member

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    I've been finding that it's not the amount of domains your have, it's the amount of email.

    Yes, mailscanner appears to create a load, but that's not a problem with MailScanner. It's more about the volume of mail that MailScanner needs to scan.

    I had to move a few heavy email users to a different server to help balance the loads.
    Lowering the amount of mail scanned will also help, so check the ACL settings and try to block as much junk as you can before it gets accepted and scanned.

    Of course, also check to see if any of the sites are running resource intensive scripts.
     
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  4. OpperGoeroe

    OpperGoeroe Active Member

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    MailScanner and SpamAssasin are very heavy, with busy servers you might try ASSP Deluxe for cPanel. I have near 750 accounts and over 3000 virtualhosts on a Dual Xeon, load average is 1 or lower. It always was 5-7 all day before I switched to ASSP.

    But I agree, servers will get stuck on e-mail, not websites.
     
  5. Metro2

    Metro2 Well-Known Member

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    Gilman, you already got some good advice above but I thought I'd add in my 2 cents from experience as well...

    I had a server running Dual Xeon's 2.8Ghz with 2GB of RAM and only 150 accounts on it, and ended up having to upgrade to a more powerful box due to two main reasons:

    - The amount of mySQL usage from scripts such as photo galleries and forums
    - The massive amounts of spam that the customers on that box were receiving

    Both of those factors were running up the load. If it weren't for the fact that most of the customers have their email addresses displayed right on their web site (getting picked up by bots and generating tons of spam) instead of using a contact form, and the fact that many of them were using scripts like photo galleries with no regard for server resources (like uploading 80mb worth of images right through their PHP gallery interface rather than FTP, forcing the server to process it all), then I probably could have avoided upgrading and put a lot more accounts on the old box.

    Adding RAM can definitely help out in some scenarios, but like the folks above me have replied, you need to research the source of your usage and load to see where it's coming from first. I've noticed that adding RAM helped out with Mailscanner / spam load in several cases, but also upgrading to a box with SATA drives instead of IDE drives helped me out too because of the iowait issues.

    It's really hard to say what the "accounts capacity" is on any given box, and like others here have already mentioned, it comes down to how your customers are using those accounts. And yep, it can be a pain in the butt to try and sort that out sometimes. Good luck.
     
  6. kris1351

    kris1351 Well-Known Member

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    How many accounts isn't a standard number. I have had dual-xeons that had 5 accounts before they were at capacity and some that had 500. It all depends on the customers that are on them.
     
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