ChrisRHS

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2006
292
5
168
A shared SSL needs to be accessed using the account user name, for example, if you installed a cert on https://xxx.com, and wish to share this throughout your server, you would need to access https://yyy.com through https://xxx.com/~yyy(account user name), otherwise, you will receive ssl errors with your browser, as the ssl cert will be for xxx.com.
 
Last edited:

sneader

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2003
1,195
66
178
La Crosse, WI
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
A shared SSL needs to be accessed using the account user name, for example, if you installed a cert on https://xxx.com, and wish to share this throughout your server, you would need to access https://yyy.com through https://www.com/~yyy(account user name), otherwise, you will receive ssl errors with your browser, as the ssl cert will be for xxx.com.
Must be a typo, otherwise, this makes no sense.

If the cert was purchased for xxx.com, then the users would access it via https://xxx.com/~yyy -- not https://www.com/~yyy.

Right?

- Scott
 

sneader

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2003
1,195
66
178
La Crosse, WI
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
Unless you get a wildcard SSL certificate (can you say EXPENSIVE?), then your proposal of using the subdomain will not work. When you get a cert, you have to specify if you want it for www.example.com, or just example.com, or maybe secure.example.com. Once you specify the correct FQDN, you cannot then just use it for yyyy.example.com, without throwing up SSL errors.

The point is... even if you could devise a way for it to function like you want, the SSL cert would still throw up errors because the FQDN doesn't match what your ordered the cert for.

- Scott
 

eth00

Well-Known Member
PartnerNOC
Mar 30, 2003
721
1
168
NC
cPanel Access Level
Root Administrator
Unless you get a wildcard SSL certificate (can you say EXPENSIVE?), then your proposal of using the subdomain will not work. When you get a cert, you have to specify if you want it for www.example.com, or just example.com, or maybe secure.example.com. Once you specify the correct FQDN, you cannot then just use it for yyyy.example.com, without throwing up SSL errors.

The point is... even if you could devise a way for it to function like you want, the SSL cert would still throw up errors because the FQDN doesn't match what your ordered the cert for.

- Scott
Wildcards have come down in price: http://www.rapidssl.com/ssl-certificate-products/rapidssl/usd/wildcard-ssl-certificate.htm
$199 there

I really thought I have seen them cheaper elsewhere I just cannot remember off hand. They are not that unreasonable anymore though.