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/tmp full! Load 3.50+! Apache down!

Discussion in 'EasyApache' started by SHSaeed, Jul 19, 2002.

  1. SHSaeed

    SHSaeed Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    The wierdest thing happened today.. Suddently I noticed all sites on this server were down. I checked the status page in WHM and it showes that the server load was on 3.50+ and that /tmp was 100% full. I did a 'ls -al' in /tmp and this is part of what I got.. http://www.antinetscape.org/temp/tmp_full01.gif

    What are those files? What program created those? Anyone know? As soon as I deleted all files in /tmp that started with &_&, the problem was solved. Sites were working and load went back down to normal.
     
  2. ecoutez

    ecoutez Well-Known Member

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    I would check my Apache logs

    If nobody owns the files, and nobody would normally have write permission in /tmp, I'd be concerned that you have a script going wild. Maybe grep through your httpd logs for &wrk&? And do the same for any other logs whose daemons run as nobody.

    And yell with what you find - this might be something we all need to keep an eye out for.

    - Jason
     
  3. SHSaeed

    SHSaeed Well-Known Member

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    The /tmp directory is available for everyone to write in. Apache uses it, PHP users it for sessions, uploads, etc..
     
  4. rpmws

    rpmws Well-Known Member

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    Often what happens is a script loops and th eoutput just continues to grow and grow which makes mod_gzip make a wrk file that grows and grows as well. Since it issn't apache that is down but mod_gzip busy here is what you need to do.

    go in /tmp

    rm * -f

    Go in WHM restart Apache.

    Do your best to find the user that crashed it. Often they will run a script and nothing comes back on the screen. He or she knows who he is on your server.
     
  5. SHSaeed

    SHSaeed Well-Known Member

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    That's true. I checked the mod_gzip configuration on the server and noticed there is no min/max limit, so now I've added these lines to it:

    mod_gzip_minimum_file_size 1024
    mod_gzip_maximum_file_size 20971520
    mod_gzip_maximum_inmem_size 2097152

    First line sets the minimum file size that is compressed to 1 KiloByte.
    Second line set the maximum file size that is compressed to 20 MegaBytes (maybe a little too high, but still a lot lower than 1 GB what do you think?).
    Third line sets the maximum in-memory file size compression to 2 MegaBytes.

    Good configuration for a shared server?
     
  6. moronhead

    moronhead Well-Known Member

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    You can also create a directory in a non-busy disk partition for *.wrk files. You need to inform apache about this:

    mod_gzip_temp_dir /home/gzip --& restart apache

    Then a cron job in /etc/crontab removes any instances of exponentially growing *.wrk files:

    0-58/2 * * * * root touch /home/gzip/tmp56.wrk
    1-59/2 * * * * root rm /home/gzip/*.wrk

    The first line will create a dummy file every 2 minutes in the temp directory. The second line makes sure any *.wrk files are removed with the same frequency.

    Just ensure the dummy file creation and the file removal times don't overlap as in the example.
     
  7. HostIt

    HostIt Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to be a dummy, but why do you need to create the dummy file? And would it work just as well to have a cron job delete .wrk files every 2 minutes from /tmp?
     
    #7 HostIt, Feb 25, 2004
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2004

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