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upgrading PHP from 5.2 to 5.3

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by mccreare, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. mccreare

    mccreare Member

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    Hi,
    I've heard a lot of scripts break - is it better now that it's been out for awhile? Is 5.3.6 better than earlier versions for deprecated things? People are asking for the upgrade but I don't want to break too many other peoples scripts. Is it a good time to do this upgrade yet?

    Thanks.
     
  2. garrettp

    garrettp Well-Known Member
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    The biggest thing you'll run into are scripts that make use of these functions which are now deprecated and will throw errors unless otherwise configured not to. 5.3.6 is no better than earlier versions of 5.3 in this case as all versions will throw the deprecated errors.

    To begin your planning on upgrading to 5.3, have a read over the deprecation list:

    PHP: Deprecated features in PHP 5.3.x - Manual
     
  3. mccreare

    mccreare Member

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    To be more specific, I have about 400 accounts on a shared web hosting server. How many of their accounts are likely to break? I can't go through all the code on all of them to check for deprecated functions.
     
  4. Infopro

    Infopro cPanel Sr. Product Evangelist
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    All of them, possibly. No real way for anyone on this forum to answer that properly. This is why it would advisable if you're concerned about this move to alert all users of whats coming soon. Push them to update their scripts, warn them several times that things might break if scripts are out of date.

    As host I don't think its your job to "go through all the code on all of them to check" tell the account owners to and what may happen if they don't.

    If these are large important accounts you might consider putting up a new server and move the accounts to it one by one. At the very least, provide an option for those who refuse to update their site software.
     
  5. mccreare

    mccreare Member

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    I was looking for folks actual experience when upgrading their customer servers.
     
  6. garrettp

    garrettp Well-Known Member
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    I don't really think it's going to help you at all, but in my experience (and I've done this a number of times), there usually isn't a big backlash going up to 5.3 from users. In the vast majority of cases where users keep their software up-to-date, there are no issues at all. Those that don't, don't usually find their entire sites are broken but instead see ugly PHP errors on their site or in their error_logs due to the deprecated functions. The most common errors I see thrown are from the deprecated ereg*() functions. So I suppose with that nugget of info you could do a global search for ereg*() functions on your users sites to get a very rough estimate of those you'll need to deal with.
     
  7. mccreare

    mccreare Member

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    Thanks so much! That's exactly what I was looking for. I just wanted to know what other people's experiences were.
     
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