/usr is 96% full - best way to manage this?

shlinky

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I cleaned out as much as I could from the /usr partition. I deleted everything in the share/doc directory but I am left with the following. I'm uncomfortable with next steps as it appears that I might have to make changes to each partition size and this type of decision as to where and how is not my forte. Perhaps someone can give me insight as what would be advisable and the best way to accomplish this.

Device Mount Point Usage
/dev/sda2 /usr 96% (9,217,752 of 10,078,768)
/dev/sda3 /var 52% (5,017,196 of 10,078,768)
/dev/sda5 / 38% (1,839,288 of 5,039,456)
/dev/sda6 /tmp 4% (167,624 of 4,031,552)
/dev/sda1 /boot 29% (135,770 of 495,781)
/dev/sda8 /home 46% (10,389,980 of 23,922,268)
/dev/sdc1 /backup 2% (6,976,916 of 480,719,056)
 

Infopro

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There are many, many threads on this forum covering this topic going back years. Scroll to the bottom of this very thread to see "Similar Threads" as an example. Each one of those threads has links to more of the same at the bottom of them as well.
 

shlinky

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There are many, many threads on this forum covering this topic going back years. Scroll to the bottom of this very thread to see "Similar Threads" as an example. Each one of those threads has links to more of the same at the bottom of them as well.
Agreed - but virtually all of them talk about locating large directories, etc. which I've done. I can't find a way to remove more than is already there. I am guessing that while 10GB may seem to be more than adequate, I may need to rob from peter to give to paul. Not sure if there is a best way to do this and, in my situation, the numbers are case specific. Thanks for your response.

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Note - I don't have the backups stored on the /usr partition nor are the logs situated there. That's why I'm posting as I believe I have exhausted all the usual and recommended ways to remove the obvious space hogs and now we've got to figure out where to go from there -- or maybe there are others we haven't explored.


34M /usr/libexec
4.0K /usr/games
295M /usr/lib64
12K /usr/src
127M /usr/lib
37M /usr/include
0 /usr/tmp
499M /usr/share
108M /usr/sbin
8.0K /usr/etc
12K /usr/aquota.user
8.0K /usr/lost+found
88K /usr/man
159M /usr/bin
3.8G /usr/local
5.0G /usr

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I can only guess that the tmp file is what is massively large in the /usr directory as there is nothing else there but directories.

- - - Updated - - -

Sorry, tmp dir
 

shlinky

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Looking through numerous posts, no simple and safe way to clean out the tmp directory, each one having caveats. Issues concerning stats programs when you have cpanel, etc. Wish there was an easier way to remove files not in use, old, etc. and figured with cpanel there might be something to help manage it. Appreciate the insight from someone with more knowledge than myself on this topic. :)
 

cPanelMichael

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Hello :)

The best option is to backup your accounts to a remote server, reinstall the OS with the recommended partition scheme, and then restore the accounts from backup. Otherwise, you will continue to have to find more space to free up as the usage increases.

Thank you.
 

shlinky

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Thanks Michael. After clearing out the accounts, I decided it was safe for a reboot. Usage on /usr went down from 96% to 57%, problem solved. :D Hope this also helps others seeking something to try before the drastic.
 

cPanelMichael

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I am happy to see your issue is now addressed. Disk space usage is not always accurate if processes with open files associated with the used space remain open. Rebooting is a quick way to ensure those processes end.

Thank you.