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What does LVE stand for?

Discussion in 'CloudLinux' started by jols, Jan 10, 2013.

  1. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    I am just getting into CloudLinux, I have one cPanel server with CloudLinux and the LVE manager installed.

    Much of the documentation references the numbers of LVEs and so on. But to get a grasp of the basic functionality I need to know what exactly is meant by an LVE. I can guess this is an account user which is under the control of the CPU/Memory/Process, etc. partitioning environment. But I for one would like to know exactly what this acronym means.

    And by the way, this stuff is not explained in the CloudLinux docs as far as I can see.

    On top of that, I would also like to find at least brief definitions for the following terms:

    aCPU
    mCpu
    lCPU
    aEP
    mEP
    lEP
    aMem
    mMem
    lMem
    MemF
    MepF

    Can anyone point me in the right direction here?

    Thanks much.
     
  2. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Okay, I found most of this stuff on another site. I would still like to know precisely what LVE stands for though:

    aCPU - average CPU usage.
    mCPU - maximum CPU usage.
    aEP - average entry processes.
    mEP - maximum entry processes.
    lEP - maximum entry processes limit.
    aMEM - average memory usage.
    mMEM - maximum memory usage.
    lMEM - memory limit.
    Memf - out of memory faults.
    Mepf - maximum entry processes faults.

    Username - LVE username.
    LVEId - username ID.
    CPU - limit of CPU in percentage.
    NCPU - CPU cores per LVE.
    MEM - memory limit.
    Entry Processes - maximum entry processes.
    Default * - values for LVE resource usage is default.


    It appears that the cPanel LVE plugin is showing automatic defaults/limits applied to every account on the server, so every account automatically is set with these limits:

    CPU: 25 (I assume 25% of 1 core?)
    MEM: 1 GB
    Concurrent Connections: 20
    Number of Cores Per LVE: 1 (I assume number of processor cores available to each user?)

    And it would seem that if a high usage account is complaining about slowdowns, then I could click on Edit Settings For Specific LVE and allocate, for example, moire concurrent connections, more memory and so on.

    I guess I am wondering where the practical limits should be set, for a server with both low and high usage accounts. Because of this, "Number of Cores Per LVE: *requires server reboot for existing LVEs" I don't want to get into a situation where I am having to reboot the server frequently just to give some accounts more cores. So I am wondering if in the world of the practical, on a server with 16 processors, if a default of 2 cores would be a bit more practical? Or if a moderately trafficked WordPress site, or site with a popular web forum, would generally not see a slowdown of their services with the 1 core allocation, unless they were being DoSed or something to that effect?
     
  3. LDHosting

    LDHosting Well-Known Member

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    If I'm not mistaken, LVE stands for Lightweight Virtual Environment.

    The CPU limit is actually a percentage of the entire system's CPU, so on a 16 core system, access to 1 core will give them access to 6.25% of the system's CPU.

    Cloudlinux will prioritise the Number of Cores setting. So, the defaults on a 16 core system will give access to 100% of 1 core (or 6.25% of the system). If you wanted to give them access to ~50% of a core, on a 16 core system you would set "cpu: 3% - Number of Cores: 1" It can take a little effort to wrap your head around it :P

    https://helpdesk.cloudlinux.com/ind...et-at-25-but-graphslveinfo-shows-only-x-limit

    For the vast majority of shared hosting accounts, we have not found the default of 1 core to be too restrictive.
     
    #3 LDHosting, Jan 10, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  4. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Hey, thanks very much for the detailed response.

    So if I do allocate 2 cores by default, I take it then, that I can scale this back some, on an account by account basis, if needed, by lowering the CPU limit/percent (for an individual account)? Am I on the right track here?
     
  5. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    In other words, let me see if I have this straight:

    With an initial allocation of 2 cores, an account will have use of up to 12.5% of the entire system's processing power.

    Okay, so if we get to a point to where this is too much, and we don't want to reboot to change the account's core number, then we simply get into the LVE Manager and set that account's CPU number down to..... what? 6.25?
     
  6. LDHosting

    LDHosting Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it sounds like you are. So, assuming a 16 core system.

    Number of cores: 1
    Max CPU of 6.25% (100% of 1 core)
    Individual accounts can be scaled back by setting CPU < 6 for that account. CPU: 3 would give them roughly 50% of 1 core.

    Number of cores: 2
    Max CPU of 12.5% (100% of 2 cores)
    Individual accounts can be scaled back by setting CPU < 12 for that account. CPU: 6 would give them roughly 50% of the 2 cores (similar CPU limits as above)
     
  7. jols

    jols Well-Known Member

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    Okay, this is good, in that it is starting to look like simple/straight math... good for me at least :)

    Thanks again for your responses.
     
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