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WHAT IS ON THE /dev/sda5 (/) PARTITION??

Discussion in 'Data Protection' started by tsediting, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. tsediting

    tsediting Member

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    I know what files are on:

    Disk /dev/sda1 (/boot) - kernels and boot related files..
    Disk /dev/sda2 (/home) - user accounts etc..
    Disk /dev/sda3 (/var) - system logs etc..



    But how do I find out whats on:
    Disk /dev/sda5 (/)

    Is there anyway to do a -ls on '/dev/sda5 (/)' ????????
    So as we can work out what is on this partition. Reason being ours is 96% FULL. and we wanna delete some files to free the partition up!
     
  2. mtindor

    mtindor Well-Known Member

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    Try typing mount or mount -l This will show you the currently mounted partitions and filesystems, what directory path they are mounted to, and any volume labels.

    If you do this and you don't see /dev/sda5 referenced, then it's not currently mounted. That would likely mean that /dev/sda5 may be a backup partition which is only mounted during the backup event.

    ADDENDUM: I didn't realize that you know where /dev/sda5 is mounted. Ok. You've got that much out of the way. You'll probably want to do a cd / and then use some du combination to show what's being used where. And then also use the find command with various options to show you all files on the filesystem of a size greater than x. Off the top of my head i don't remember what the find command would be to do that, but it can be done.

    Check the following link for some examples for using find.

    http://www.codecoffee.com/tipsforlinux/articles/21.html

    Mike
     
    #2 mtindor, Jun 14, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2008
  3. tsediting

    tsediting Member

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    thanks for that...

    I have been going through all the logs and backups + a few 3rdparty .tar files have deleted everything I can think of and have managed to only save 7% of space (got down from 98% to 91%)

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda5 4.8G 4.1G 458M 91% /
    /dev/sda3 4.8G 782M 3.8G 18% /var
    /dev/sda2 63G 4.6G 55G 8% /home
    /dev/sda1 76M 11M 62M 16% /boot
    tmpfs 248M 0 248M 0% /dev/shm
    /usr/tmpDSK 485M 11M 449M 3% /tmp

    any ideas as to what other files I could delete in order to get a green light?

    thanks..
     
  4. kran

    kran Well-Known Member

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    tsediting how did you fixed it

    Were you able to resolv this issue? I'm having the same problem..
     
  5. JPC-Shaun

    JPC-Shaun Well-Known Member

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    Run the following command on the server and paste the output:

    cd /
    du -ah --max-depth=1

    You need to login to server SSH as a root user to run this command.
     
  6. sirotex

    sirotex Well-Known Member

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    Disk /dev/sda5 (/) is root partition
     
  7. kran

    kran Well-Known Member

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    Found problem

    there were several core files in the /root directory I erased them and problem solved....
     
  8. brianoz

    brianoz Well-Known Member

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    A more correct find command is:

    Code:
    find / -xdev -print
    
    but the find command to actually find possible recent large files is:

    (find on root any file created in the last 7 days with a size of more than 5mb):

    Code:
    find / -xdev -mtime -7 -size +10000 -print | xargs ls -ld
    A critical ingredient here is the "-xdev" which stops the find leaving the starting file system (in this case / or sda7).
     
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