[WHM] confused about "SQL Services >> Change MySQL DB Owner Password" terminology

cPancake

Member
Jan 28, 2011
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WHM : Main >> SQL Services >> Change MySQL DB Owner Password

What is meant by "Owner password" ?

Is this the same as

cPanel : MySQL Databases >> MySQL Users >> Add New User: Password ?

Thanks,
Alan

- WHM 11.28.64
- cPanel 11.28.64
 

LinuxTechie

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2011
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Hi Alan,

This feature allows you to change passwords for a database owner. As this feature does not require the old password, this can be useful if a password is compromised or forgotten.


To change a password:

1 Select the user from the MySQL User list.
2 Enter a new password in the New Password field.
* Remember to choose a secure password.
* You may also use the Password Generator by clicking Generate Password.
3 Confirm the password in the Password (Again) field.
4 Click Change Password.
 

LinuxTechie

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Jan 22, 2011
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Hi Alan,

The option :

cPanel : MySQL Databases >> MySQL Users >> Add New User: Password ? : Will add a new user and a password will be set for the user.

The option :

WHM : Main >> SQL Services >> Change MySQL DB Owner Password : Used to change the password of existing mysql db owners.

So, the answer is there is difference between the options.
 
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cPancake

Member
Jan 28, 2011
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Hi Varda,

The confusion is not in the options themselves, it's in their terminology (re: subject line)

One talks about password "owner", the other about password "user".

From what I understand from your latest post, MySQL DB "owner password" (in WHM) and "user password" (in cPanel) are the same, i.e. when the "owner password" is changed through "WHM : Main >> SQL Services >> Change MySQL DB Owner Password", it changes the "user password" which was set through "cPanel : MySQL Databases >> MySQL Users >> Add New User: Password" .

Correct ?

Regards,
Alan
 
Last edited:

LinuxTechie

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Jan 22, 2011
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Hi Alan,

I would like to correct it here. It will change the password of the database owner only. There is difference between users and owner of the database.
 

cPancake

Member
Jan 28, 2011
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Hi Varada,

excuse me my ignorance,

the difference is ... ?

edit #1: its even more confusing because "WHM : Main >> SQL Services >> Change MySQL DB Owner Password" first asks to select a "MySQL User" (to change the owner password) and results in "Change MySQL User Password: Password changed for (...) to (new password)"

edit #2: searched the MySQL online manual for "owner password" which gives "refman-50 - There are no matches for the search term."; found "user password" and "root password" but "owner password" is a mystery
 
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cPanelKenneth

cPanel Development
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Apr 7, 2006
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With version 11.28 the cPanel account can have a separate password for cPanel (which is the system password) and MySQL. The 'Change MySQL DB Owner Password' interface in WHM allows root/reseller to change just the MySQL password for the account.

The term 'DB Owner' refers to something internal to the database mapping functionality and is an artefact of something that changed during development. The title should more clearly state 'Change MySQL Password for cPanel Accounts' or something like that.
 

cPancake

Member
Jan 28, 2011
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Hi Kenneth,

what is this "cPanel Account MySQL password" good/useful for ?
so far I've only found what "MySQL user password" (in cPanel) and "MySQL root password" (in WHM) mean
 
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cPanelDavidG

Technical Product Specialist
Nov 29, 2006
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Hi Kenneth,

what is this "cPanel Account MySQL password" good/useful for ?
so far I've only found what "MySQL user password" (in cPanel) and "MySQL root password" (in WHM) mean
For the typical hosting customer, there's 2 ways to authenticate into one of their databases:

1. Create a MySQL user, assign that MySQL user some permissions to a desired database and login as that MySQL user. This is sometimes referred to as using a MySQL virtual user.

2. Authenticate using your cPanel credentials.

This second option becomes tricky in environments where you do not want your website to break because you changed your cPanel password. That is one potential use for keeping the password used for authenticating as the cPanel user different for MySQL than for cPanel itself.

Personally, I prefer if everyone just used MySQL virtual users, it just makes things much less of a headache in the long-run. However, many who are experienced with non-control panel environments are accustomed to authenticating as the system (cPanel) user into a database.