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Wordpress migration from MySQL server to Mariadb server

Discussion in 'Database Discussion' started by PeteS, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. PeteS

    PeteS Well-Known Member

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    I am migrating several Wordpress sites from a server with MySQL 5.6 to a new server that currently also is running MySQL 5.6. But I plan to upgrade the new server to Mariadb 10.1.

    It is my understanding the Mariadb 10.1 is supposed to be a drop-in replacement for MySQL 5.6, and that while MySQL 5.7 will be a part of cPanel 70, cPanel's recommendation is to migrate to Mariadb.

    Q1: can anyone speak to the compatibility of the latest WP version with Mariadb 10.1?

    Q2: would there be any advantage in migrating all the WP sites to the new server first, and *then* upgrading to Mariadb? (I suppose not, if the migration does not touch the WP cope and the data tables, etc. Therefore if a fresh install of WP likes Mariadb 10.1 then any that migrate from a MySQL 5.6 server to a Mariadb 10.1 server would be just as happy, right?)
     
    #1 PeteS, Feb 5, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
  2. rpvw

    rpvw Well-Known Member

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    A1: I upgraded to MariaDB 10.1 some months ago and all the WordPress sites are running just perfectly.

    A2: You may have the best results migrating the WP sites first, keeping them on MySQL 5.6 on the new server. Then upgrading to MariaDB 10.0 (This caused me to have to change a lot of the passwords due to incompatibilities - see more of my adventures at MySQL/MariaDB Upgrade ) and finally to 10.1
     
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    #2 rpvw, Feb 5, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
  3. PeteS

    PeteS Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, rpvw, for your report and the link (useful info in there too)!

    I currently don't have 10.0 installed (just 10.1 and 10.2). I'm not sure what of any problem I would have coming from a MySQL 5.6 to a Mariadb 10.1 server, unless you have details on that other than the password issue. (My WP installations should all be newer than 4.0.)
     
  4. rpvw

    rpvw Well-Known Member

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    Other than passwords, I don't expect you to have any issues at all. Let the cPanel SQL update scripting do the heavy lifting and I think you will be pleasantly surprised how easy it all went.

    If you want to dot all the i's and cross the t's, audit all the installed WP add-ons for their SQL requirements to ensure non are incompatible.
     
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  5. PeteS

    PeteS Well-Known Member

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    I think I will take your advise and complete migration first, then move to Mariadb. That way if it takes down a site(s) due to add-on issues I can roll the server back via a backup restore as a last resort.

    Thanks!

    EDIT
    It has seemed odd to me that cPanel appeared to be moving away from MySQL, but then said 5.7 was going to be part of v 70. This blog post sheds light on that: Being a Good Open Source Community Member: Why we hesitated on MySQL 5.7 | cPanel Blog

    This quotes from the blog sums it up for me:
     
    #5 PeteS, Feb 7, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2018
  6. rpvw

    rpvw Well-Known Member

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    MariaDB or MySQL ? ............... I guess it comes down to who you trust most !

    Many of the statements here are my speculation only. You can research the whole subject using a search engine and determine your own position.

    Michael "Monty" Widenius was one of the founders of MySQL AB and subsequently the company was acquired by Sun Microsystems, and later by the Oracle Corporation.

    It is widely reported that "Monty" was uncomfortable with the Oracle acquisition, and there was much speculation in the industry as to whether the Oracle corporation would continue to develop MySQL in the spirit with which it had been created, or if it would become merely a stepping stone towards an Oracle Database ..... or even if the Oracle corporation would start aggressively charging for commercial licenses to deploy MySQL.

    As a consequence, "Monty" and some of the other founding developers of MySQL left, and started MariaDB (Named after Monty's younger daughter Maria) vowing to keep the new software free and under the GNU GPL

    To date, we have not yet seen any of the predicted and expected aggressive marketing of MySQL licenses by Oracle, but we have seen MariaDB Corp. release a new licensed version of it's Max Scale database proxy software that is no longer open source and available under a propriety commercial Business Source Licence. Not entirely unsurprising, as we never did understand how MariaDB was going to adequately fund its R&D in the first place.

    As far as the technical aspects go, we are seeing MariaDB and MySQL play leap-frog in their development at the moment. A developer "arms race" can result in accelerated development, new features and an altogether better product....BUT....they can also lead to poor decisions, inadequately tested code reaching the end user, and escalating costs and overheads that someone has to ultimately pay for, or the project will grind to a halt.

    I have to wonder if the sudden resurgence of the development of MySQL is less about making the product more attractive to its target users, and more about pushing the competing SQL developers out of their financial comfort zone by forcing them to accelerate their own development schedules and, as was intended, to be obliged to find new revenue streams to cover the inflating costs.

    So at the end of the day, who do you trust ? The multinational Oracle Corporation that is a slave to its investors and shareholders and has a less than steller reputation for adhering to their licensing models and pricing the moment the bean counters see a loss in revenue, or the underdog Monty and his crew who have come to the rescue of the open source community.

    Spend some time with your favourite search engine and get the facts for yourself ..... and then you can make an informed judgement (or you can be like me and whatever you decide will turn out to be wrong :( )

    Footnote: I do think that cPanel ought to think long and hard about which horse it is backing, and if it is going to sit on the fence, at least provide users with the ability to switch back and forth between the 2 SQL platforms. The current one-way (there is no turning back) migration option is obviously a significant source of stress to many cPanel server administrators.
     
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    #6 rpvw, Feb 8, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2018
  7. cPWilliamL

    cPWilliamL cP Technical Analyst II
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    MySQL 5.6 leaves primary support in Feb 2018:
    http://www.oracle.com/us/support/library/lifetime-support-technology-069183.pdf

    Since version 70 is a long term release, we didn't want MySQL 5.6 to be the default for new installs of the LTS, only for 5.6 to leave primary support early in the life span of version 70.

    While we do support, and allow, moving from MySQL to MariaDB, we do not support going from MariaDB to MySQL. The two database services are diverging. MariaDB still strives for compatibility with MySQL. They want to be a drop-in replacement for MySQL. Thus they put forth effort to have compatibility with MySQL. MySQL does not strive for compatibility with MariaDB.

    Since MariaDB strives for drop-in support for MySQL, providing new installs with MySQL as a default provides greater flexibility to the end-user.
     
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  8. PeteS

    PeteS Well-Known Member

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    All good points. I will be trusting neither and both ;) because ultimately I have put my trust in cPanel to cover my back and find solutions as necessary. Thanks @cPWilliamL for the additional info. It does make sense that things are set up the way they are. I agree that being able to switch back and forth would be wonderful, but I didn't expect to be possible for the reasons given. My decision is to stay with MySQL 5.7 with the idea that Mariadb will remain an option going forward.
     
  9. linux4me2

    linux4me2 Well-Known Member

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    I think your decision to stick with MySQL for the time being is smart, since the future "default" seems to be MySQL, at least for now.

    If you'd like to see an automated method of converting from MariaDB to MySQL (and back, if needed), there's an open discussion in Feature Requests (Automated Conversion From MariaDB to MySQL) where you can vote and/or comment. It would be great to be able to pick whichever database offers the best features and performance, and not be stuck with a choice long-term without migrating to a new server.
     
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